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Home The Decades 1940s National WWII Museum

National WWII Museum

pavilion

"Courtesy of The National World War II Museum."

VAV!/March 26, 2014/NEW ORLEANS

The National WWII Museum is intent on telling the story of the American Experience in the war that changed the world.  Dedicated in 2000 as The National D-Day Museum and designated by Congress as America's National WWII Museum, its mission is to learn why the war was fought, how it was won, and just what it means today.  This museum celebrates the American Spirit, the teamwork, optimism, undaunting courage and endless sacrifice of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and the Home Front.

For more information, call 877-813-3329 or 504-527-6012 or visit www.nationalww2museum.org. Follow them on Twitter at WWIImuseum or visit their Facebook fan page.

If you'd like to find out more about the National WWII Museum Events, check out their calendar.

The Museum's six-acre campus and pavilions will offer an opportunity to learn fascinating stories and personal accounts, see spectacular restored WWII aircraft, and enjoy a hands-on educational museum experience.  Check out a broad variety of artifacts that comprised the "big guns" of American military might. These include a restored B-17G Flying Fortress, B-25J Mitchell, SDB-3 Dauntless, TBM Avenger, P-51D Mustang, Corsair F4U-4 and an interactive submarine experience based on the final mission of the USS Tang.

This world-class museum is a place where future visitors can gain a fuller appreciation of what so many Americans achieved in World War II and can reflect on what today's generation of warfighters continue to do for us every day." 

The National WWII Museum celebrates the American Spirit, the teamwork, optimism, courage and sacrifice of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and the Home Front.

For more information, call 877-813-3329 or 504-527-6012 or visit www.nationalww2museum.org. Follow them on Twitter at WWIImuseum or visit their Facebook fan page.


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Last Updated ( Monday, 08 December 2014 04:02 )  

 

 

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