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Home The Decades 1970s President Nixon's Resignation

President Nixon's Resignation

VAV!/August 9, 2011

In a national televised address on the evening of August 8, 1974, President Nixon announced his decision to resign as United States President. August 9, 1974 at noontime, President Richard Nixon's resignation was official. The President had been facing the possibility of certain impeachment and removal from office for the Watergate scandal.

What was Watergate?

Watergate or the Watergate Scandal was an American political scandal taking its name from the Watergate Hotel in Washington DC. The Watergate Scandal was the targeted site of a June 17, 1972 break in of the Democratic Party National Headquarters located in Watergate.

The burglars were Bernard Baker, James W. McCord, Jr., Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinex and Frank Sturgis who were all linked to officials of Nixon's 1972 Committee to Re-elect the President.

Soon following the break in, the FBI, Watergate Committee officials, and media investigations by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, both of the Washington Post, discovered these burglars were linked to officials of President Nixon's 1972 Committee to Re-elect the President.  The  investigations revealed illegal activities, wiretaps, and campaign 'tricks' undertaken in connection with Nixon and his staff.

As a result of these incriminating findings, several administration officials resigned. E. Howard Hunt, Jr. and G. Gordon Liddy were indicted for burglary, conspiracy, and violations of federal wiretapping laws in connection with the burglary. Former Attorney General John Mitchell was convicted of offenses connected with the break-in.

President Nixon vehemently denied any involvement with the Watergate Burglary.

Through court orders, tape recordings of conversations between the President and his advisers it was revealed that Mr. Nixon had indeed participated in a cover-up. Also revealed, was Nixon's attempt to use the Central Intelligence Agency to divert the FBI's investigation into the break-in.

And the rest of the story is history...

Following Nixon's resignation, Vice President Gerald Ford became president of the United States. On September 8, 1974, Ford pardoned Nixon for "all offenses against the United States" which Nixon "has committed or may have committed or taken part in" during his presidency.

Nixon responded with an issued statement in which he said that he regretted "not acting more decisively and forthrightly in dealing with Watergate."


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Hurricanes Throughout History

Pictured above: Mississippi Gulf Coast in august 1969 following Hurricane Camille. This scene of destruction was typical of the damage left by Hurricane Camille when it ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 1969. The eye of the storm passed directly over the Bay of St.Louis and killed or injured hundreds of Gulf Coast residents. (SSC-97-032)/NASA. VAV!/August 29, 2014 "By Chrismus! Wasn't that hurricane a lulu? I was settin here readin when I noticed it was gettin so damn dark. I couldn't see... I looked out the winder and saw our big tree going over as easy as you please -not all at once, but little by little. I watched it down and said that I bet the one in front wouldn't go for that was stronger. Then I saw one of our garage doors spinning by the winder and right across the street on to Doctor Brown's lawn. Somehow it got going on its edge like one of them straw hats we used to wear, and it was certainly making time." - One witness's description September 21, 1938, regarding a Category 3 hurricane nicknamed "the Long Island Express" Hurricanes have been and always will be an integral part of life in the United States...the Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.    What exactly is a Hurricane? Hurricanes, also known as cyclones in the western Pacific or typhoons in the Indian Ocean, are large and violent storm systems that begin in tropical seas during the summer or fall.  They are capable of producing torrential rains, large hail, dangerous waves, epic flooding, violent winds with a well-defined circulation and minimum sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (64 knots) or higher, and tornadoes,  all of which may result in catastrophic property damage and staggering loss of life.   

 

Hurricanes Throughout History

Pictured above: Mississippi Gulf Coast in august 1969 following Hurricane Camille. This scene of destruction was typical of the damage left by Hurricane Camille when it ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 1969. The eye of the storm passed directly over the Bay of St.Louis and killed or injured hundreds of Gulf Coast residents. (SSC-97-032)/NASA. VAV!/August 29, 2014 "By Chrismus! Wasn't that hurricane a lulu? I was settin here readin when I noticed it was gettin so damn dark. I couldn't see... I looked out the winder and saw our big tree going over as easy as you please -not all at once, but little by little. I watched it down and said that I bet the one in front wouldn't go for that was stronger. Then I saw one of our garage doors spinning by the winder and right across the street on to Doctor Brown's lawn. Somehow it got going on its edge like one of them straw hats we used to wear, and it was certainly making time." - One witness's description September 21, 1938, regarding a Category 3 hurricane nicknamed "the Long Island Express" Hurricanes have been and always will be an integral part of life in the United States...the Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.    What exactly is a Hurricane? Hurricanes, also known as cyclones in the western Pacific or typhoons in the Indian Ocean, are large and violent storm systems that begin in tropical seas during the summer or fall.  They are capable of producing torrential rains, large hail, dangerous waves, epic flooding, violent winds with a well-defined circulation and minimum sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (64 knots) or higher, and tornadoes,  all of which may result in catastrophic property damage and staggering loss of life.   

 

Hurricanes Throughout History

Pictured above: Mississippi Gulf Coast in august 1969 following Hurricane Camille. This scene of destruction was typical of the damage left by Hurricane Camille when it ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 1969. The eye of the storm passed directly over the Bay of St.Louis and killed or injured hundreds of Gulf Coast residents. (SSC-97-032)/NASA. VAV!/August 29, 2014 "By Chrismus! Wasn't that hurricane a lulu? I was settin here readin when I noticed it was gettin so damn dark. I couldn't see... I looked out the winder and saw our big tree going over as easy as you please -not all at once, but little by little. I watched it down and said that I bet the one in front wouldn't go for that was stronger. Then I saw one of our garage doors spinning by the winder and right across the street on to Doctor Brown's lawn. Somehow it got going on its edge like one of them straw hats we used to wear, and it was certainly making time." - One witness's description September 21, 1938, regarding a Category 3 hurricane nicknamed "the Long Island Express" Hurricanes have been and always will be an integral part of life in the United States...the Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.    What exactly is a Hurricane? Hurricanes, also known as cyclones in the western Pacific or typhoons in the Indian Ocean, are large and violent storm systems that begin in tropical seas during the summer or fall.  They are capable of producing torrential rains, large hail, dangerous waves, epic flooding, violent winds with a well-defined circulation and minimum sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (64 knots) or higher, and tornadoes,  all of which may result in catastrophic property damage and staggering loss of life.   

 

Hurricanes Throughout History

Pictured above: Mississippi Gulf Coast in august 1969 following Hurricane Camille. This scene of destruction was typical of the damage left by Hurricane Camille when it ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 1969. The eye of the storm passed directly over the Bay of St.Louis and killed or injured hundreds of Gulf Coast residents. (SSC-97-032)/NASA. VAV!/August 29, 2014 "By Chrismus! Wasn't that hurricane a lulu? I was settin here readin when I noticed it was gettin so damn dark. I couldn't see... I looked out the winder and saw our big tree going over as easy as you please -not all at once, but little by little. I watched it down and said that I bet the one in front wouldn't go for that was stronger. Then I saw one of our garage doors spinning by the winder and right across the street on to Doctor Brown's lawn. Somehow it got going on its edge like one of them straw hats we used to wear, and it was certainly making time." - One witness's description September 21, 1938, regarding a Category 3 hurricane nicknamed "the Long Island Express" Hurricanes have been and always will be an integral part of life in the United States...the Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.    What exactly is a Hurricane? Hurricanes, also known as cyclones in the western Pacific or typhoons in the Indian Ocean, are large and violent storm systems that begin in tropical seas during the summer or fall.  They are capable of producing torrential rains, large hail, dangerous waves, epic flooding, violent winds with a well-defined circulation and minimum sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (64 knots) or higher, and tornadoes,  all of which may result in catastrophic property damage and staggering loss of life.   

 

Hurricanes Throughout History

Pictured above: Mississippi Gulf Coast in august 1969 following Hurricane Camille. This scene of destruction was typical of the damage left by Hurricane Camille when it ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 1969. The eye of the storm passed directly over the Bay of St.Louis and killed or injured hundreds of Gulf Coast residents. (SSC-97-032)/NASA. VAV!/August 29, 2014 "By Chrismus! Wasn't that hurricane a lulu? I was settin here readin when I noticed it was gettin so damn dark. I couldn't see... I looked out the winder and saw our big tree going over as easy as you please -not all at once, but little by little. I watched it down and said that I bet the one in front wouldn't go for that was stronger. Then I saw one of our garage doors spinning by the winder and right across the street on to Doctor Brown's lawn. Somehow it got going on its edge like one of them straw hats we used to wear, and it was certainly making time." - One witness's description September 21, 1938, regarding a Category 3 hurricane nicknamed "the Long Island Express" Hurricanes have been and always will be an integral part of life in the United States...the Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.    What exactly is a Hurricane? Hurricanes, also known as cyclones in the western Pacific or typhoons in the Indian Ocean, are large and violent storm systems that begin in tropical seas during the summer or fall.  They are capable of producing torrential rains, large hail, dangerous waves, epic flooding, violent winds with a well-defined circulation and minimum sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (64 knots) or higher, and tornadoes,  all of which may result in catastrophic property damage and staggering loss of life.   

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