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Home The Decades Art Deco San Francisco Earthquake, 1906

San Francisco Earthquake, 1906

earthquake1906sanfrancisco

This photograph (ARC 522964) reveals a fireman extricating a survivor from the ruins

VAV!/April 18, 2012  

In the early morning hours of April 18, 1906, San Francisco, CA was awakened to a devastating earthquake.

The quake, with an epicenter near San Francisco, lasted nearly a minute and could be felt from southern Oregon to Los Angeles and as far inland as central Nevada. Buildings were destroyed, and the city burned for three days leaving 500 city blocks in ruin. The wrath of the earthquake and subsequent fires killed an estimated 3,000 people and left half of the city's 400,000 residents homeless.

The San Francisco earthquake is considered one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history.

 

Sounds Courtesy of  US Geological Survey (USGS). Captured is The 1992 Magnitude 7.3 Landers Earthquake/Recorded at Long Valley Caldera


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Last Updated ( Monday, 11 November 2013 06:09 )  

 

 

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