Vintage Allies

Monday
Aug 31st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home The Decades Art Deco The Arrow Collar Man

The Arrow Collar Man

arrow11

Pictured above:  Arrow Collar advertisement

VAV!/November 4, 2011

The Arrow Collar Man, a title given to a very few select male models, was the very essence of an erudite, suave, and debonair gentleman.  He was impeccably coiffed, breathtakingly cool, aloof yet approachable, and always donned an exquisitely creased collar.   For a quarter of a century between 1905 and 1931, the Arrow Collar Man (later these alpha males simply became known as the Arrow Men) was the advertising icon for the Arrow Co., maker of detachable collars manufactured by Cluett Peabody & Company of Troy...and eventually one of the largest makers of men's shirts in the world.

arrow1

The Arrow Collar Man was one of the most iconic advertising images in history...he served as the antithesis to the ever popular and beguiling Gibson Girl.  During 1920, the Arrow Collar Man received more fan mail than Rudolph Valentino.  His erotic appeal was so great, its whispered in some circles, that the Arrow Collar Man had inspired the 1923 Broadway musical, "Helen of Troy."  Even President Theodore Roosevelt got into the act and referred to him as a "superb portrait of the common man". 

arrow3

The ads themselves, featuring the Arrow Collar Man, were a collaborative effort of New York ad agency Calkins and Holden; Cluett, and Peabody advertising director, Charles Connolly ; and the iconic commercial illustrator J. C. Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 – July 25, 1951). Leyendecker's model for the first Arrow Collar Man was his live-in companion, a Canadian named Charles Beach.

.arrow22

arrow4       arrow6

 arrow8

arrow10            arrow12

 arrow13

arrow14      arrow15

arrow17           arrow18

arrow19           arrow21


blog comments powered by Disqus
Last Updated ( Monday, 03 August 2015 20:49 )  

 

 

Like us on Facebook!

Stock Trader Scroller

Powered by Stock Market News and Money Transfer

 

General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers (SCAP), arrived in Japan on August 30, 1945 To Oversee Formal Surrender

Pictured aboveTalks with Allied and Japanese newsmen after his arrival at Atsugi airfield, Japan, on 30 August 1945. Standing behind General MacArthur, at right, is General Robert L. Eichelberger. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph/http://www.history.navy.mil/our-collections/photography/us-people/m/macarthur-douglas-in-japan-august-1945-june-1950/nh-84346.html VAV!/August 27, 2015 On August 28, 1945, American troops began landing in Japan for a formal surrender following the surrender of the Japanese government in World War I1 ... The first American landings in Japan were made at 0900 on August 28, 1945 by an airborne advance party of 150 communications experts and engineers. Their destination...a navy airfield at Atsugi, twenty miles southwest of Tokyo. Their mission..setting up the communications and operational facilities for the arrival of four-engined planes carrying the 11th Airborne Division who would establish the American airhead in the Atsugi area.

 

August 28, 1945 - American Troops Land In Japan

Pictured above:  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives, 80-G-472620 VAV!/August 27, 2015 On August 28, 1945, American troops began landing in Japan for a formal surrender following the surrender of the Japanese government in World War I1 ... The first American landings in Japan were made at 0900 on August 28, 1945 by an airborne advance party of 150 communications experts and engineers. Their destination...a navy airfield at Atsugi, twenty miles southwest of Tokyo. Their mission..setting up the communications and operational facilities for the arrival of four-engined planes carrying the 11th Airborne Division who would establish the American airhead in the Atsugi area.

 

August 28, 1945 - American Troops Land In Japan

Pictured above:  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives, 80-G-472620 VAV!/August 27, 2015 On August 28, 1945, American troops began landing in Japan for a formal surrender following the surrender of the Japanese government in World War I1 ... The first American landings in Japan were made at 0900 on August 28, 1945 by an airborne advance party of 150 communications experts and engineers. Their destination...a navy airfield at Atsugi, twenty miles southwest of Tokyo. Their mission..setting up the communications and operational facilities for the arrival of four-engined planes carrying the 11th Airborne Division who would establish the American airhead in the Atsugi area.

 

Duke Paoa Kahanamoku - Father Of Modern Surfing

   Pictured above: Duke P. Kahanamoku/Contributed by Screen Grab© VAV!/August 24, 2015 "Aloha is my creed." -  Duke Paoa Kahanamoku, (August 24, 1890 – January 22, 1968), The Father of Modern Surfing. The legendary Duke Kahanamoku, the Father of Modern Surfing, was born in Honolulu, Hawaii on Aug. 24, 1890, and grew up in Waikiki. An expert swimmer, Duke was one of the original native Hawaiian, bohemian Waikiki Beach Boys who rode the mountainous waves and pioneered surfing...

 

Duke Paoa Kahanamoku - Father Of Modern Surfing

   Pictured above: Duke P. Kahanamoku/Contributed by Screen Grab© VAV!/August 24, 2015 "Aloha is my creed." -  Duke Paoa Kahanamoku, (August 24, 1890 – January 22, 1968), The Father of Modern Surfing. The legendary Duke Kahanamoku, the Father of Modern Surfing, was born in Honolulu, Hawaii on Aug. 24, 1890, and grew up in Waikiki. An expert swimmer, Duke was one of the original native Hawaiian, bohemian Waikiki Beach Boys who rode the mountainous waves and pioneered surfing...

Follow Us On

Vintage Allies on Facebook.com Vintage Allies on Twitter.com