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Home The Decades Shapell Manuscript Foundation

Shapell Manuscript Foundation

VAV!/June 3, 2012

An outstanding resource, the Shapell Manuscript Foundation,  is an independent educational organization dedicated to the collection and research of original manuscripts and historical documents. The foundation's focus is on the histories of the United States and the Holy Land, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.  The collection includes original manuscripts and documents of leading political figures and world-renowned individuals, such as the whole range of American presidents, author and humorist Mark Twain, Nobel-prize winning scientist Albert Einstein, founder of political Zionism Theodor Herzl , and more.

Examples of the collection you'll no doubt find riveting includes:

A working draft of a speech, heavily revised by Reagan in his own hand, on the JFK and RFK assassinations – both the result, Reagan said, of un-American influences. JFK's murder by Oswald, who renounced his American citizenship to embrace Soviet communism, brought "communist violence... to our land," and RFK's assassination, by a Palestinian, was due, he noted presciently, to "the violence of war in the Middle East imported by an alien."

The 96th Running of the Indianapolis 500,

Lincoln's Famous Letter to Young Fanny McCullough About Death,

Loss & Memory, President William Howard Taft, Heartbroken at the Loss on the Titanic of His Military Aide, Writes An Emotional Eulogy,

An Extraordinary Orville Wright Letter: How Watching Birds Led to Manned Flight at Kitty Hawk, and

Wyatt Earp: An Incredibly Rare Letter


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