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Pin-Ups

The Decades - Pin-Ups

Bettie Page 36-24-37

Bettie Page  36-24-37

Pictured above:  Bettie Page

VAV!/August 13, 2013

Bettie Page was worshiped, celebrated and criticized, but this iconic 1950′s Queen of Pin-ups and Pin-up heroine became an obsession who bewitched and enchanted worshiping followers...yesterday and today.

An enchantress, Bettie was born, Betty Mae Page, April 11, 1923 in Jackson, Tennessee, southwest of Nashville.  Bettie was the second of six children growing up in a family so financially strapped, she was quoted as saying 'we were lucky to get an orange in our Christmas stockings.' Financial hardships weren't the only worries on Bettie's mind as a child. It's said that Page's father had molested all of the girls in the family. What is known, however by all reports,  is that Bettie's father was eventually sent to prison, and for a period in her life, she lived in an orphanage. By ten years of age, her parents had divorced bringing on a period of change...

In spite of all of this turmoil and tragedy, and likely not in her wildest dreams, did Bettie predict that one day she would become an unforgettable underground icon known as 'the girl with the perfect figure'.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 06 July 2014 07:36 )

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The Decades - Pin-Ups

Great American Pin-Up

Great American Pin-Up

Art Work by Gil Elvgren "Miss Sylvania"

VAV!/December 20, 2011/With Interview by Rebecca E. Parsons and Louis K. Meisel of the Louis K. Meisel Gallery

Featured on this page...

Last Updated ( Monday, 16 September 2013 21:34 )

The Decades - Pin-Ups

Their Own Pin-Ups

Their Own Pin-Ups

Pin-Up girls have been a part of the American landscape and history since the 1890s, but became most popular in the 1940s during World War II.

Many "pin ups" were the...

Last Updated ( Friday, 01 July 2011 05:08 )

 

 

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Rosie The Riveter

Pictured above:  Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter/ On May 29, 1943...Memorial Day...Norman Rockwell's own image of "Rosie the Riveter" appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post. Please note the patriotic theme, background, along with the attributes of strength and femininity.  Of interest: Rosies' penny loafers rest casually on a copy of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf, a magazine article. VAV!/May 29, 2012  By Starlight Reporter {play}images/audio/VAV!SavedFromTheFlames309-RosieTheRiveterjohnC.Graham1943.mp3{/play} The above iconic image of Rosie the Riveter became the central face of  Rosies throughout America and served as the rallying cry for an entire social movement.  Rosie the Riveter was one of the most widely known personas of the 1940s. With her hair in a polka dot kerchief, sleeves rolled up, and a positive set to her jaw and eyes, Rosie could never be taken for granted.  She had a can do attitude, femininity, beauty and yes, sex appeal.

 

Rosie The Riveter

Pictured above:  Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter/ On May 29, 1943...Memorial Day...Norman Rockwell's own image of "Rosie the Riveter" appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post. Please note the patriotic theme, background, along with the attributes of strength and femininity.  Of interest: Rosies' penny loafers rest casually on a copy of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf, a magazine article. VAV!/May 29, 2012  By Starlight Reporter {play}images/audio/VAV!SavedFromTheFlames309-RosieTheRiveterjohnC.Graham1943.mp3{/play} The above iconic image of Rosie the Riveter became the central face of  Rosies throughout America and served as the rallying cry for an entire social movement.  Rosie the Riveter was one of the most widely known personas of the 1940s. With her hair in a polka dot kerchief, sleeves rolled up, and a positive set to her jaw and eyes, Rosie could never be taken for granted.  She had a can do attitude, femininity, beauty and yes, sex appeal.

 

The Age of Adaline

Pictured above:  Adaline, portrayed by Blake Lively VAV!/May 21, 2015/Contributed by Star In Her Eyes A sweet, romantic tale, The Age of Adaline, is a different kind of film. Though it's a romance, there is a touch of science fiction to explain Adaline's peculiar situation. Instead of a typical movie, the film seems more like a fantasy tale done in water colors and rose-water. Adaline is like everyone else who ever lived. She decides to marry and have a child and nothing seems extraordinary about her life. Things change when she is involved in a one car accident. Nature collides with science, and she changes. But Adaline never changes, never ages, and has to leave her hometown so the government does use her as a test subject. She never spends too much time in one place but keeps up with her daughter, happy with her simple, nomadic life. That changes when she meets Ellis Jones, and her feelings for him cause her to rethink all her rules.

 

The Baltimore And Ohio Railroad

VAV!/May 20, 2015 The story that the B&O Railroad Museum can tell better than any other organization on earth is the story of how railroads and railroaders shaped the course of American history during pivotal moments of the conflict. - B& O Railroad Museum Through the years, railroads have always played an integral part in the settlement of America and its industrialization. They carried people from coast to coast and through the placement of stations enabled the establishment of urban centers that served rural populations. Major industrial centers developed alongside the railroad's major transportation hubs. Railroad centers provided links to the other major form of bulk transportation, river transportation and ocean-going vessels. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, pioneered by Philip E. Thomas and George Brown in Baltimore, Maryland, was the location of one of the first commercial railroads  Here's how history plays out in the Baltimore and Ohio's beginning days... In 1826, Thomas and Brown carefully studied the railway systems in England, at the time, commercial ventures. Following their findings, they called a meeting on February 12, 1827, with some twenty-five citizens, primarily Baltimore merchants or bankers, "to take into consideration the best means of restoring to the city of Baltimore that portion of the western trade which has lately been diverted from it by the introduction of steam navigation and by other causes."

 

The Baltimore And Ohio Railroad

VAV!/May 20, 2015 The story that the B&O Railroad Museum can tell better than any other organization on earth is the story of how railroads and railroaders shaped the course of American history during pivotal moments of the conflict. - B& O Railroad Museum Through the years, railroads have always played an integral part in the settlement of America and its industrialization. They carried people from coast to coast and through the placement of stations enabled the establishment of urban centers that served rural populations. Major industrial centers developed alongside the railroad's major transportation hubs. Railroad centers provided links to the other major form of bulk transportation, river transportation and ocean-going vessels. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, pioneered by Philip E. Thomas and George Brown in Baltimore, Maryland, was the location of one of the first commercial railroads  Here's how history plays out in the Baltimore and Ohio's beginning days... In 1826, Thomas and Brown carefully studied the railway systems in England, at the time, commercial ventures. Following their findings, they called a meeting on February 12, 1827, with some twenty-five citizens, primarily Baltimore merchants or bankers, "to take into consideration the best means of restoring to the city of Baltimore that portion of the western trade which has lately been diverted from it by the introduction of steam navigation and by other causes."

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