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Home Fine Living Technology Henry Ford's Assembly Line

Henry Ford's Assembly Line

VAV!/July 30, 2012

Henry Ford, an American Inventer and the founder of the Ford Motor Company was one of the first to apply assembly line manufacturing to the mass production of affordable automobiles.

During the 20th century, Henry Ford set forth to build an affordable car that the average American worker could afford.  Out of his ingenuity and determination,  there arose the Model T.  But there's certainly more to this story from history.  Central to Ford's ability to produce an affordable car, was the development of the assembly line that would increase the efficiency of manufacture and decreased its cost. Henry Ford did not conceive the assembly line concept, he perfected it through trial and error.

Between 1908 and 1913, Ford Motor Company forged the practice of moving the work from one worker to another until it became a complete unit.  Then, by arranging the flow of these units at the right time and the right place, they moved to a  final assembly line and became a finished product.  This newly designed task of building a car was far simpler than the plan devised whereby workers moved from car to car.

Implementation of the assembly line was begun at the new Ford Highland Park plant which was purpose-built to incorporate the assembly line. The assembly line process began at the top floor of the four-story building where the engine was assembled and progressed level by level to the ground floor where the body was attached to the chassis.  In total, the assembly line was easier, simpler, and faster... moving the chassis along, beginning at one end of the plant with a frame and adding the axles and the wheels; then moving it past the stockroom, instead of moving the stockroom to the chassis.

The creation of the assembly line has virtually reversed the process of automobile manufacture throughout the world.Henry Ford and the Model T irrevocably altered American society.

In 1927, Ford assigned a plan for his own museum...the Henry Ford Museum. The complex was dedicated in 1929 and opened to the public in 1933. The Museum contains an invaluable collection of Americana.

 


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Last Updated ( Monday, 15 September 2014 07:56 )  

 

 

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